“The camera is an excuse to be someplace you otherwise don’t belong. It gives me both a point of connection and a point of separation.”

-Susan Meiselas

WHERE TIME STANDS STILL

CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE


The radiation is contained but the damage can’t be undone. The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone is like a disaster national park, where the remnants of villages and towns serve as attractions while nature slowly returns.

Roaming the deserted streets and buildings, one can’t help feeling like a time traveller exploring the world of 1986 when whole towns and villages were deserted from one day to the next. The attraction to explore and sift through the wreckage looking for clues of the life that was, is strong, and compelling.

NATURE IS BACK
WHO LIVED IN THIS HOUSE?

SOFA BED
PERSONAL

Pripyat
The Pripyat Community Center was only open a couple of months when the reactor disaster happened. It really is an impressive building, the architecture, the aesthetic and the scale. Any town would be proud of such a facility.

COMMUNITY CENTER
SPORTS HALL,PRIPYAT
SWIMMING POOL
SPORT HALL CLIMBING FRAME
SPORT HALL CLIMBING FRAME
COMMUNAL THEATRE
BOXING RING
Cold War Monument

The 'Wood Pecker'


Wood Pecker listening station
Duga (Russian: Дуга) was a Soviet over-the-horizon (OTH) radar system used as part of the Soviet anti-ballistic missile early-warning network. The system operated from July 1976 to December 1989. Two operational Duga radars were deployed, one near Chernobyl and Chernihiv in the Ukrainian SSR (present-day Ukraine), the other in eastern Siberia.

The Duga systems were extremely powerful, over 10 MW in some cases, and broadcast in the shortwave radio bands. They appeared without warning, sounding like a sharp, repetitive tapping noise at 10 Hz,[1] which led to it being nicknamed by shortwave listeners the Russian Woodpecker. The random frequency hops disrupted legitimate broadcasts, amateur radio operations, oceanic commercial aviation communications, utility transmissions, and resulted in thousands of complaints by many countries worldwide. The signal became such a nuisance that some receivers such as amateur radios and televisions actually began including ‘Woodpecker Blankers’ in their circuit designs in an effort to filter out the interference. Read more>>

Entrance to radar complex
YOUR COUNTRY NEEDS YOU
150m high...
Cold War Toy
Detail

The May day Fair that never was
Pripyat was getting ready for the May Day celebrations, but they never happened. Disaster struck on April 26th. The ferris wheel is one of the most poignant symbols of the deserted town.

Pripyat Hospital
The first responders, unaware of the radiation leak, were taken to the local hospital. Many died days, weeks later. As a result the hospital was contaminated with radiation.

Hospital Entrance
Operating Theatre
Maternity Ward
HOSPITAL WARD ROOM
HOSPITAL SANITATION
HOSPITAL SANITATION
HOSPITAL ROOM
HOSPITAL ROOM
HOSPITAL ROOM #2
HOSPITAL ROOM #2

“A photograph has picked up a fact of life, and that fact will live forever”

-Raghu Rai


Middle School Number 3
This was one of 5 secondary schools in Pripyat. Located on Sportivnaya Street, it’s in relatively good condition.

One feature of the school are the hundreds of child gas masks in open boxes and scattered all over the floor. A product of the cold war era, they were designed to provide protection against nuclear, biological and chemical attack.

CLASS ROOM
CLASS ROOM

SCHOOL CORRIDOR AND GAS MASKS
GAS MASKS
SCHOOL
SCHOOL
SCHOOL BLOCK
SCHOOL BLOCK
SCHOOL CORRIDOR
SCHOOL CORRIDOR
SCHOOL CORRIDOR #2
SCHOOL CORRIDOR #2
CAFE INTERIOR
CINEMA

APARTMENTS
CAFE